CPR First Aid

How to Induce Vomiting in a Dog?

The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline strongly suggests to only induce vomiting in a dog when a veterinary doctor prescribes it. The process may involve the administration of hydrogen peroxide. But, if there is no recommendation from a healthcare professional, it is best to perform the appropriate pet first aid before contacting the helpline. The treatments require a flannel, normal saline, and a pressure immobilisation bandage. It may take longer to treat your pet if you do not have these items on hand. Setting up a first aid kit for your dog in an emergency is ideal. To learn more about these, read further and know how to treat your dog.

How to Induce Vomiting in Dogs?

Wag Walking, a US-based pet caregiver, states that a veterinarian may recommend to induce vomiting in dogs. It’s usually done if there is a toxic or harmful substance inside the dog’s gastrointestinal tract.

The same healthcare professional will provide the instructions which may involve the administration of 3% hydrogen peroxide by mouth.

However, vomit induction is not always the solution and a veterinary doctor may recommend doing different treatments instead.

Wag Walking, a US-based pet caregiver, states that a veterinarian may recommend to induce vomiting in dogs. It’s usually done if there is a toxic or harmful substance inside the dog’s gastrointestinal tract.

How to Treat Poisoning Instead of Inducing Vomiting in a Dog?

The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline outlines the following first-aid steps if a doctor does not recommend vomit induction. 

Rinse or Wipe Out their Mouth for Ingested Poison

It is not helpful to make your dog vomit if they have eaten something dangerous. Pet owners should only do it if a veterinarian or the Poisons Helpline asks to do so. 

Instead, find a damp towel or flannel, and use it to rinse or wipe out their mouth. Then, contact the Animal Poisons Helpline on 1300 869 738.

Wash their Skin or Hair Thoroughly

If there is poison or a chemical on their fur or skin, wash that area thoroughly with gentle soap and water. If this is done as soon as possible, there is a chance to avoid any irritation, burns, or systemic poisoning. Then, call the Animal Poisons Helpline for further advice.

Irrigate the Eye with Tap Water or Normal Saline

If there is something on your pet’s eye, try to irrigate it with tap water or normal saline for up to 15 minutes. Do it from the inner corner going outwards towards the side of the face. Make sure that the chemical does not transfer to the other eye. This is best done with the assistance of another person to keep your dog from moving. Call the Animal Poisons Helpline afterwards.

Move your Dog to Fresh Air

If there is an accidental exposure to gas or fumes, move your dog away to an area with fresh air. Try to keep them calm and contact the Animal Poisons Helpline for guidance. 

Apply a Pressure Immobilisation Bandage for a Snake Bite

If your dog was bitten by a snake, try to make them calm, limit movements, and bring them to the nearest veterinary clinic.

However, if the snake bite was made on a limb, it would be best to apply a pressure immobilisation bandage before bringing your dog to a doctor. A similar treatment is done in humans and is taught in first aid training at Park Regis Griffin Suites, 604 St Kilda, Melbourne VIC 3004.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Poisoning in Dogs?

There may be a need to apply one of the above treatments if your dog shows the following.

  • Restlessness
  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting
  • Shaking
  • Seizures
  • Excessive panting
  • Lethargy
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Pale gums
  • Coughing
  • Bloody nose or bleeding gums
  • Swellings on the skin
  • Wobbliness
  • Excessive salivation

The signs and symptoms may depend on the cause.

There may be a need to apply one of the above treatments if your dog shows the following.

What are the Causes of Poisoning in Dogs?

Animal Welfare Victoria identifies the common dog poisons on its website.

  • Medications – aspirin, paracetamol, ibuprofen
  • Household hazards – ant baits, antifreeze (ethylene glycol)
  • Fertilisers
  • Lead
  • Rodenticides
  • Insecticides
  • Molluscicides
  • Snail and slug bait

The website of the same government agency identifies which ingredients of these products may harm your dog.

How to Prevent Poisoning in Dogs?

PestSmart, which provides pest animal control programs in Australia, recommends the following preventive measures to keep your dog safe from poisoning.

  • Use dog muzzles to prevent them from scavenging carcases, baits, or toxic vomit
  • Keep baits in secure containers
  • Tell the neighbours or put up signs if you plan to set up baits in your home so they can keep their pets safe
  • Keep a contact list of veterinary clinics in the area and information for pet first aid

It may also be ideal to have a first-aid kit for your dog to keep the contacts list and poisoning treatment essentials.

PestSmart, which provides pest animal control programs in Australia, recommends the following preventive measures to keep your dog safe from poisoning.

Conclusion

It’s important to induce vomiting in a dog according to a veterinarian’s advice by administrating hydrogen peroxide. If a doctor does not recommend it, you may apply the appropriate first aid treatment according to the entry of a ​poisonous substance. Once this is done, it is best to call the Australian Animal Poisons Helpline on 1300 869 738 for further advice. There may be a need to apply pet first aid once your dog shows any signs and symptoms of poisoning. Medications, household hazards, fertilisers, lead, and pest control substances are the common causes of it. But, by applying preventive measures, you may help your dog be safe from poisoning.

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